Driving Under the Influence of alcohol or controlled substances is one of the most devastating crimes for which an individual can be charged. Unlike many other crimes, DUI may involve driver’s license suspensions, insurance cancellation, mandatory drug and alcohol assessments and treatment, and mandatory imprisonment.

The government is now charging people with driving under the influence of drugs even if they are taking prescribed medications.

You pay your lawyer for his experience and expertise.

Attorney Jack W. Cline has been helping people with DUI charges for over 28 years. He recently attended the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers 3-day DUI Defense Seminar entitled “Getting the Not Guilty Verdict” in Las Vegas, Nevada. He was invited to join the National College for DUI Defense, which he was accepted in 2012. Much of the new material involves learning how to defend drivers “under the influence” of prescription medicines and how to attack machine-produced blood alcohol test results that police, courts and juries are often to ready to accept without challenge or scrutiny.

Attorney Cline has helped 1200 individuals with their DUI cases over his career. More importantly, he has appeared before courts in Mercer, Butler, Crawford, Lawrence, Clarion, Erie, Venango and Allegheny County, with jury trial experience in nearly all of those counties. The experience throughout Western Pennsylvania has enabled Attorney Cline to develop defense tactics learned from various court systems and lawyers, not just his home county. Well under half of Mr. Cline’s cases have resulted in convictions over the years.

Attorney Cline has won several appellate court decisions in DUI cases resulting in convictions being reversed, many of these cases being reported in the law journals.

a)   Commonwealth v. Ferry, 479 WDA 2003 (Pa. Superior Court).  Stop of motorist veering into turn lane on 3-lane highway and back into his own lane was ruled a bogus stop by police and Defendant’s DUI conviction was reversed by Superior Court.

b)   Commonwealth v. Cabraja, 316 WDA 2004 (Pa. Superior Court); No. 314 WAL 2005 (Pa. Supreme Court).  Police violated Fourth Amendment when they arrested Defendant in his girlfriend’s house for DUI without a warrant or exigent circumstances.  Conviction reversed.

c)   Commonwealth v. Carlson, 705 A.2d 468 (Pa. Superior Court).  Pennsylvania Gam Warden’s attempt to arrest Defendant for DUI was improper when he went outside his normal call of duty to make the DUI arrest.  Conviction reversed.

d)   Commonwealth v. McFadden, 549 A.2d 1341 (Pa. Superior Court).  In an old but still good case, police could not arrest Defendant for DUI on private property.

Contact us Now, click here